Looping Rods Create Intimate Portrayal

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Looping Rods Create Intimate Portrayal

This unexpected structure, temporarily exhibited in North Dakota, was a result of the collaboration between artist Marjorie Schlossman and architect Robert Moorhead and sons. The design was to pay homage to the settlers who had traveled the area by covered wagon. After countless models and exploration, the result was a looped structure that swayed in the wind like prairie grasses. This architecture is composed of over 200 thirty-foot long thermoplastic composite rods. To achieve the design, the rods were layered and woven, leaving the space intimate and open to the surrounding prairie landscape.

This design is a perfect example of matching the material utilized to the concept, or “brand”. The rods themselves reflected the linear nature of the artist’s paintings (which included the painting on the floor) and also the natural surroundings, consisting of prairie grasses, while the overall design mirrored the historical quality and purpose. Although the space was used to exhibit art, the architecture was left uncovered, proving the power that an exposed structure can have.

Allison Pocewicz

Allison Pocewicz

Allison has had a lifelong interest in multiple facets of design. Growing up between a sewing machine and a sketch pad, she went on to fine-tune her skills through studies in fine arts and fashion design. Upon entering the design/build industry, she continuously researches trends in various markets, including retail, hospitality, exhibitory/events, interiors and architecture in order to provide valuable educational and inspirational resources to clients.

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